Barbara Kowalcyk

Barbara Kowalcyk
Assistant Professor and Director of the Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention
Department of Food Science and Technology, The Ohio State University
Office: 
213 Parker Food Science and Technology
Phone: 
614-292-6487
Degree Information: 
PhD, Environmental Health (Epidemiology/Biostatistics), University of Cincinnati
MA, Applied Statistics, University of Pittsburgh
BA, Mathematics, University of Dayton
Specialization: 
Food Safety, Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Public Policy
Biography: 

Barbara B. Kowalcyk is a recognized expert in food safety and has broad experience and training in epidemiology, public health informatics, risk science, regulatory decision making, and public policy. For over 15 years, her efforts have focused on advancing a more systems-based approach to food safety that promotes evidence-based decision making from farm to fork to physician and considers the broader connectedness of human, animal, and environmental health. In 2006, Dr. Kowalcyk co-founded the Center for Foodborne Illness Research & Prevention, a national 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to advancing a stronger, more science-based food safety system that prevents foodborne illness and protects public health. In 2017, she joined the faculty at The Ohio State University (OSU) in the Department of Food Science and Technology and the Translational Data Analytics Institute. Dr. Kowalcyk has served on many national committees, including two National Academy of Sciences committees and her current appointment to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) Science Board. In addition to her extensive experience in food safety, Dr. Kowalcyk has more than 10 years of experience as a biostatistician conducting clinical research and providing support to data safety monitoring boards in the pharmaceutical industry. Dr. Kowalcyk’s research interests include linking public health information with data from across the food system to enhance the understanding of foodborne disease epidemiology, supporting the development of evidence-informed policies and practices that prevent foodborne illness, and changing behaviors around food safety across the food system.